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Carlotta - the museum database

OBJTXTUtställningstext, Korsvägar, eng

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1A fragment from the edge of a bowl, from Fustat, with green glaze and Arabic lettering in black. The fragment dates from the late 13th-14th century. At that time, Fustat was ruled by the Mamluks. Parts of the city were abandoned, as a result of the Black Death, in 1348, as well as that Cairo was the center of the Mamluk empire. Mamluk means owned in Arabic and they were slave soldiers of the sultan. In the middle of the 13th century, the sultan’s bodyguards seized power and formed their own sultanate.
1Arabic lettering can be seen running along the inner edge of the fragment, as well as a geometric pattern. Dates from the late 13th-14th century. Living creatures were seldom depicted in religious contexts, and instead, items were decorated with inscriptions, geometric designs, plants and leaves. These were popular along the edges of platters during Roman times, but during this period, they were given more room.
1Arabic lettering in white, with etched lines. Covered in a yellow-green transparent glaze. The inscription is fragmented, but it could be the religious title of honor, Al-Mawlawi. Dated late 13th-14th century.
1Between horizontal lines, Arabic lettering may state al-makhdum, which can be translated as: one who is prosperous.
1Bottom fragment of a bowl. In the middle, Arabic script can be seen. Dates from the late 13th-14th century.
1Bottom of a bowl with an Arabic or Arabic inspired inscription. The fragment is dated from the 13th-14th century and comes from Fustat, which is known for this particular type of ceramics.
1Ceramic fragment, from the bottom of a bowl, from the city of Fustat. Etched inscriptions can be seen, on the surface, that are filled with black-brown and reddish colors, covered by a yellow transparent glaze. The fragment dates from the late 13th-14th century. At that time, Fustat was ruled by the Mamluks. Mamluk means owned in Arabic and they were slave soldiers of the sultan. In the middle of the 13th century, the sultan’s bodyguards seized power and formed their own sultanate, with political and military power in Egypt and remained in power until the 16th century.
1Decorated fragment with Arabic script. Dated from the late 13th-14th century. In the National Museums of World Culture’s collections, there are over 1,000 ceramic fragments, from Fustat. The fragments were collected during the first half of the 20th century. Some of the fragments may have come from other places. Fustat was connected with many other places, during its existence. A few international archaeological investigations have been conducted on the site and have revealed ceramic finds in Fustat that originally came from China, Japan and Vietnam. Much of the ceramics cannot be exactly dated, as they have not come from archaeological digs, but rather from surface finds.
1Etched and painted decorations, covered by a green transparent glaze. It dates from the late 13th-14th century. An Arabic inscription can be seen running along, as a horizontal band, under the edge. It is not entirely clear, but it is possible that al-makhdum, which means “one who is prosperous” might be written in the middle.
1Etched pattern and white Arabic script, covered by green glaze. The inscription reads Al-Ali, the Exalted One or li-Ali, which means for the Exalted One.
1Fragment, with an inscription in Arabic, from the city of Fustat, dated from the 13th-14th century. “Al-Mawlawi” might be written on it, which is a religious title of honor.
1Fragment dated to the late 13th-14 century. It is decorated with white calligraphy and an emblem on the edge. Some Arabic lettering is visible on the surface, but no words are legible. The emblem on the edge is similar to a tricolored shield found during the Mamluk reign, but those most often had a middle field in another color. The emblem has three fields that are associated with the emirs of the second half of the 13th century.
1Fragment from Fustat, decorated with a shield and Arabic characters. This type of ceramic was thrown and usually used as tableware for eating and drinking. Dates from the late 13th-14th century.
1Fragment from Fustat dated from the late 13th-14th century. Inscription that cannot be deciphered. In the Middle Ages, Cairo was one of the world’s greatest cities. The city was the capital of the Fatamide and Mamluks, with connections to both the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean. At that time, Fustat functioned as the city’s harbor and as a quarter filled with craftsmen, workshops and kilns for manufacturing ceramics.
1Fragments from Fustat, with writing on both sides, dated from the 13th-14th century. The name Fustat is presumed to have come from the Greek work phossaton, which means entrenched camp, but probably was the name of what was usually called Trajan’s Canal, which connected the Nile to the Red Sea. It ran through the Greek entrenched camp in Babylon, where Fustat was founded. Today, Fustat is part of Old Cairo, Egypt.
1Part of a bowl that dates from the late 13th-14th century. On the inside, Arabic script and an emblem can be seen. The goblet represents the cupbearer, saqi, in Arabic. The cupbearer probably served the sultan drink and remained close at hand.
1Part of a bowl that dates from the late 13th-14th century. On the inside, Arabic script and an emblem can be seen. The goblet represents the cupbearer, saqi, in Arabic. The cupbearer probably served the sultan drink and remained close at hand.
1The ceramic fragment dates from the late 13th-14th century. On the fragment, there are visible lines etched into the clay and decorations painted in white and black under a yellow transparent glaze. A black goblet can be seen in the oval. The marking symbolizes the person who held the position of cupbearer, or saqi, an important position that included more than just serving drinks. The cupbearer held a high rank and was close at hand for the Sultan.
1The ceramic fragment is decorated in black and blue, and covered with a layer of transparent glaze. Part of the decoration includes inscriptions that appear to be Arabic, but are illegible. They might be “pseudo-Arabic” or rather made up Arabic lettering. Most likely, the person who crafted the bowl designed the decorations to look like Arabic. This type of ceramic was a popular and common commodity, even in Europe, where literacy was not as important. They were quite often copied. Dates from the 14th century.
1The ceramic sherd is decorated in black and blue, and covered with a layer of transparent glaze. Dates from the 14th century. This type of ceramic is common among finds from Fustat, Egypt’s first Arabic capital. Decorations could include Arabic inscriptions, such as these do, as well as floral or medallion patterns. Even the outside could be decorated, with this type of bowl. Something that these fragments in the display case are missing, but which is generally quite common, is the name of the person(s) who crafted it, painted in blue on the outside.
1The fragment has decorations on both the inside and outside. On the outside, Arabic lettering in reddish-brown, under a transparent yellow glaze, can be seen. It is possible to read al-makhdum, the one who is prosperous. Dated late 13th-14th century.
1The fragment is decorated on the inside and outside, both sides have fragmented Arabic script. Dated from the latter 13th-14th century. Fustat developed into a city with many skilled craftsmen. But a lot of imported ceramics were also found. The craftsmen were inspired by ceramics from far away, while ceramics manufactured in Fustat were highly sought after, elsewhere.
1The fragment is decorated with geometric patterns on the outside and calligraphy on the inside. Dated from the late 13th-14th century. Today, Fustat lies on the outskirts, as part of Old Cairo, Egypt. When Fustat was founded, the area was under the control of the East Roman Empire. The city remained, when Cairo was founded a little to the north, in the 10th century. In 1168, the city was ordered burned to the ground, as a defense measure, when one of the Crusades was nearing Cairo. The seat of power finally moved completely to Cairo and what once was Fustat, became a part of the new city of Cairo.
1The sherd dates from the late 13th-14th century. Arabic lettering in brown, with etched lines. When Fustat was founded, after the Arabic conquest in 641, the city quickly became a commercial hub, in the network connecting Europe and Asia. The city grew big, with multistoried buildings. Fustat became less significant, when Cairo was founded in 969.