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Carlotta - the museum database

OBJTXTBeskrivning, engelska

CountValue
1A.W. Bahr was born in Shanghai in 1877 to a German father and a Chinese mother. He founded the Central Trading Company with a friend in 1898. Throughout the next few years, he remained in China, organizing various art exhibitions with pieces from his own collection. Bahr moved to London, England in 1910, where he continued to exhibit art, finally moving to Canada with his family in 1946. Before his death in 1959, Bahr donated pieces of his collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. (Smithsonian Instituion Research Information System, SIRIS)
1a) Sparrow on a branch, b) Cherry blossoms c) Peach bloom, d) Li-chi fruits, e) Pome-granate, f) grass-hopper, g) Lotusflowers, h) Cicada on a branch, i) Pale yellow chrysantemum, j) Jasmine flower, k) Vegetables, l) White orchid
1Aberdeen, Hongkong.
1A bridge, Chengtu, Szechuan. Teh Yuan Photo Studio, Chungking.
1Abstract dragon-shaped plaque. Probably decoration on a wood or laquer coffin. Similar examples can be found in Warring States tombs in Hebei province.
1A bush warbler (uguisu) on a prunus tree branch. Hanging scroll without mounting. Ink and colour on paper. Artefacts or pictorial art such as paintings or calligraphy are customarily placed in the tea room alcove (tokonoma) together with a simple floral arrangement (chabana). The tranquil, austere pictoures by Shōkadō Shōjō (1584-1639) were deemed suitable for hanging in the alcove during the tea ceremony. The nightingale motif, like the prunus flower, symbolises the approach of spring. Shōkadō Shōjō was a painter and calligrapher, known as one of "the Three Brushes", i.e. famous artist and calligraphers, of the Kan´ei era (1624-1643). Shōjō was also a priest at a temple of esoteric Buddhism southwest of Kyoto. In addition, he wrote waka poetry (31 syllables) and was himself a tea master. Shōjō associated with the country´s uppermost cultural and political élite. He was in many ways a typical polymathc representative of the "tea people" of his time. (Japan. Föremål och bilder, s. 137)
1Accodring to note "40 hela, 10 fragm.", numbers possibly not correct. Schultz 09-2018
1According to Fan Cen Kung of Song built AD 600-
1Achaistic inscription
1A cock. Painting in ink and red colour on paper. 39,5 x 53 cm
1A courtesan. Painting sketch in ink and colours on paper. Mounted as a kakemono. Attributed to Kaigetsudo. Probably a model for a colour print. Colour instruction written on the painting. Ca 1700. Japan. 35,5 x 76 cm
1A delegation from the Henan Provincial Administration for Cultural Heritage visited the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities on Friday 27 July 2018. Their mission was to discuss possibilities for cooperation on an exhibition in China commemorating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of the Yangshao culture by Johan Gunnar Andersson, the first Director of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, and his Chinese colleagues such as Ding Wenjiang and Yuan Fuli. 1. Feng, Fuping (Director of Culture, Press and Publication Bureau of Jiaozuo City) 2. Zhang, Ting (Curator, Zhengzhou Museum) 3. Wang, Hongwei (Deputy Director, Pingdingshan Municipal Administration of Cultural Heritage) 4. Michel Lee (Curator, National Museums of World Culture, Sweden) 5. Chen, Yantang (Deputy Director, Henan Provincial Administration of Cultural Heritage) 6. Annica Ewing (Deputy Director of Collections, National Museums of World Culture, Sweden) 7. Isabelle Leeman (Curatorial Assistant, National Museums of World Culture, Sweden) 8. Li, Wenchu (Section Chief, Luoyang Municipal Administration of Cultural Heritage) 9. Liang, Fawei (Deputy Researcher, Henan Provincial Institution of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology)
1Adorned with an elaborate motif of a peony spray and a bat in underglaze blue, this pear-shaped bottle has a long neck and a lip around the faintly flaring mouth. The body is drooping. Wrapping around the bulging part of the vessel, the peony spray is painted in the gureuk-style - the leaves and petals were outlined with a fine dark blue line and filled in with a lighter blue wash. The petals of the peony are left white along the edges, and blue pigment was used in varying shadings to enhance contrast for a more painterly, realistic depiction. The stylized bat is painted in the same manner, with some attention to details. The footrim was wiped free of glaze and shows no traces of kiln grit. The bat is another auspicious animal motif that was popular during the Joseon dynasty as decorative design on ceramic vessels, furniture, roof tiles or metalwork. The Chinese word for "bat" is a homophone for the word for "good fortune" in Chinese (pronounced "fu") as well as in Korean (pronounced "bok"). The bat was regarded as a symbol of blessing and good fortune and predominantly features in decorative underglaze blue designs on white porcelain of the late Joseon period, sometimes combined with peonies or chrysanthemums, as can be seen in this particular piece.
1Adorned with an elaborate motif of a peony spray and a bat in underglaze blue, this pear-shaped bottle has a long neck and a rimmed lip around the faintly flaring mouth. The body is drooping and bottom-heavy. Wrapping around the bulging part of the vessel, the peony spray is painted in the gureuk-style - the leaves and petals were outlined with a fine dark blue line and filled in with a lighter blue wash. The petals of the peony are left white along the edges, and blue pigment was used in varying shades to enhance contrast for a more painterly depiction. The stylized bat is painted in the same manner, with some attention to details. A blue line encircles the wide foot of the bottle. The base is coated in glaze that has curdled during firing; the body material that has been exposed to oxidation during the firing process has turned an orangish colour. The footrim has been wiped free of glaze and coarse dark kiln grit adheres to it. The bat (Sino-Korean: pyeonbok) is another auspicious animal motif that was popular during the Joseon dynasty as decorative design on ceramic vessels, furniture, roof tiles or metalwork. The Chinese word for "bat" is a homophone for the word for "good fortune" in Chinese (pronounced "fu") as well as in Korean (pronounced "bok"). The bat was regarded as a symbol of blessing and good fortune and predominantly features in decorative underglaze blue designs on white porcelain of the late Joseon period, sometimes combined with peonies or chrysanthemums, as can be seen in this particular object.
1A hexagonal and a tube-shaped bead made of agate on a string. According to the old catalogue records, these objects originate from Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang Province, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE).
1A kimono-clad (furisode) young woman playing with a cat in a doorway. The cat plays with a floral ball, woman holding a red string. Outside the door opening glimpse of a garden with low stones and bamboo, painted in the Kano-school style.
1Albert von Le Coq (1860–1930) was a German archaeologist and explorer of Central Asia. He was heir to a sizable fortune derived from breweries and wineries scattered throughout Central and Eastern Europe, thus allowing him the luxury of travel and study at the - no longer existing - Ethnology Museum (German: Museum für Völkerkunde) in Berlin. Serving as assistant to the head of the Museum, Professor Albert Grünwedel, Le Coq helped plan and organize expeditions into the regions of western Asia, specifically areas near the Silk Road such as Gaochang. When Grünwedel fell ill before the departure of the second expedition, Le Coq was assigned to lead it. His account of the second and third German Turpan expeditions was published in English in 1928 as "Buried Treasures of Chinese Turkestan". The expeditions found extensive networks of Buddhist and Manichaean cave temples in the Xinjiang region of Northwest China. Although many of the manuscripts found in the cave were destroyed during the excavation, von Le Coq speculated that he had discovered a major Manichaean library. Some of the paintings also led him to believe that he had found evidence of an "Aryan" culture, related to the Franks. With the help of his assistant Bartus, Le Coq carved and sawed away over 360 kilograms (or 305 cases) of artifacts, wall-carvings, and precious icons, which were subsequently shipped to the museum. In Buried Treasures ..., Le Coq defends these "borrowings" as a matter of necessity, citing the turbulent nature of Chinese Turkestan at the time of the expeditions. Chinese consider this seizure a "colonial rapacity" comparable to the taking of the Elgin Marbles or the Koh-i-Noor diamond. The artifacts were put on display at the museum and were open to the public until 1944 when the relics were destroyed in a British bombing raid during World War II. Le Coq said that the depictions of figures with apparently blue eyes, red hair and cruciform swords resembled Frankish art: "Such more striking are representations of red-haired, blue-eyed men with faces of a pronounced European type. We connect these people with the Aryan language found in these parts in so many manuscripts.. These red haired people wear suspenders from their belts.. a remarkable ethnological peculiarity. (wikipedia, 2012-01-30)
1Album with 22 leafs depicting the Cultivation of Tea.
1Album with ten album leafs painted in lacquer colours on paper. By Shibata Zeshin (1807-1891). Lackmålning.
1Altar Chalice of porcelain with fruits in underglaze red. Kang Hsi.
1Amida Buddha standing among clouds. Painting in ink, gold and colours on silk. Hanging scroll. Kamakura style. Mounted with gold brocade and blue silk.
1A narrow creek, Kiangsu, Kina.
1Anders Hellström, living in Mölndal had started to collect bronzes early. He obtained a substantual number of bronzes from Orvar Karlbeck but he also frequently purchased bronzes from the great European dealers. He thus built up the most important private collection of ancient Chinese bronzes in Sweden with a great number of unique pieces. After his death his large collection (some 1300 items) was bought by the museum. The most important bronzes were published by Karlgren in "Bronzes in the Hellström Collection" (Karlgren 1948), but a large part of his collection has remained unpublished. (Siggstedt, Mette, 2009, Bulletin, no 77, p. 68)
1Andersson pondering the magnitude of the discovery. Lanzhou 1924.
1Ando Hiroshige (1797-18589 By vid Oiso i regn. Blad nr 9 i “Tokaido-serien”. The coastal village of Oiso in rain. Motif no 9 in the “Tokaido series”.
1Angle frament of tile, greyish-yellow fabric (stonepaste). Blue and red plum and peach blossoms on aubergine coloured stems and green leaves depicted on a white background, under a clear trasparent glaze.
1Anthropomorphic figure with horns, wings and a bird's tail. Human-bird hybrid.
1Aoife O’Brien received her Ph.D. in Anthropology/Art History from the Sainsbury Research Unit for the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the University of East Anglia in England in 2011. Her doctoral research focused on material culture from the Solomon Islands in the early colonial period. Her research interests include ethnography, visual anthropology, museum anthropology, Pacific Island studies, and cultural encounters. She has previously worked for the National Museum of Ireland and recently she held an appointment as a Senior Research Fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In the spring of 2015 and 2016 she taught new courses for the Department of Art History and Archaeology. A lecture course titled “Introduction to the Arts of Oceania” was taught both years. In 2015 an advanced seminar titled “Power, Authority and Spirituality in Oceanic Art” was offered, with a Freshman Seminar entitled “Understanding Oceanic Art" taught the following year. She will return to Washington University in spring 2017 to repeat the course “Introduction to the Arts of Oceania” as well as another new Freshman seminar, “Imagining the Pacific: from Captain Cook to Disney’s Moana.” These courses represent the first time the Department has been able to offer courses in this exciting area, so well represented by distinguished local collections at our neighboring institution, The Saint Louis Museum. Dr. O'Brien's fellowship is shared with the Saint Louis Art Museum. During her tenure at Washington University, she is the Korff Postdoctoral Fellow in Oceanic Art; while working on her appointment at the Saint Louis Art Museum, she is the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Oceanic Art. In fall 2014, Dr. O'Brien assisted with the exhibition Atua: sacred gods from Polynesia as well as undertaking research on the museum's Oceanic collections. Dr. O'Brien is continuing research on the museum’s Oceanic collections as well as preparing for a rotation of Polynesian objects in a new exhibition space. She is further preparing a temporary installation focusing on bird feather and bone objects from the Pacific, due to open in December 2016. This will provide an important expansion of the museum’s permanent display of Oceanic Art. (https://arthistory.artsci.wustl.edu/people/aoife-obrien, read 2017-10-09)
1A pair of cups, porcelain, decorated with peonies and bamboo in enamel colors on a yellow Fund. Ching, the late 1700s.
2Apart from the numerous Three Kingdoms ceramics and precious metal regalia, the Korean collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities also holds a variety of beads made from glass and semi-precious stones, including jade, of the Three Kingdoms period. Beads were often attached to metal ornaments, such as girdles, earrings, bracelets and crowns, or threaded to a string to form magnificent necklaces. Glass beads were made in various colours and shapes from melted silica sand. The comma-shaped beads (Korean: gogok) are typical for the cultures of Silla, Gaya and Baekje, and were also found in Japan. Their form is believed to have derived from the shape of animal teeth. Featuring prominently on golden crowns, girdles, earrings and lavish necklaces from tombs of the Silla elite, they are believed to be a mark of high social status.
1A performance by dancers marks the arrival of the lunar New Year. Pine trees, which appear in the background, are traditional New Year’s decorations.
1Archaistic
1archaistic jade made in the form of a sword scabard chap.
1A solitary fisherman at Kajikazawa, Kai province, the outline of the peak of Fuji appearing beyond above the mist. Image number 15 from the series 36 Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjūrokkei in Japanese). /PH
1A stone bridge, Chengtu, Szechuan. Teh Yuan Photo Studio, Chungking.
1A temple, Omei Shan, Szechuan. Teh Yuan Photo Studio, Chungking.
1At the centre of the stepped bottom plate, there is a vertical, flat handle in the shape of a double gourd. At the centre of the handle, a hole facilitates the tying of a cord to the seal. The stamping surface is inscribed with a seal script version of the character 寶, which generally means "treasure" but was also used as a term for "seal." The stamping surface is covered with remains of red seal paste. The origin of Korean seals can be traced back to China, where seals are known to have been in use since at least the Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE). The earliest Korean seals date to around the 3rd century CE (Three Kingdoms period 57 BCE – 668 CE), and it is assumed that seals started to be used from that time as a means for certifying and authenticating official and personal documents, as well as paintings and calligraphies. There were two kinds of seals: official seals used by kings, feudal lords and government offices; and private seals with names, sobriquets or excerpts from poems or classics, comparable to a personal signature. In the Goryeo Dynasty (918 – 1392), three consecutive government offices in charge of official seals were established and operated. There are no known official seals surviving from the Goryeo government because they were disposed of when the new Joseon government took over the leadership of the country in the late 14th century. However, private seals of the Goryeo period are still extant in large numbers. They are generally of bronze and consist of a bottom plate with an inscribed stamping surface and a handle that can either be simple or ornate, which allowed them to be fastened to a waist belt. Inscriptions include Chinese characters, but also symbols and geometric patterns, and are in many cases indecipherable. The inscriptions and decoration of the seals are often associated with longevity or good fortune and include Buddhist symbols. Although not much is known about their function, they were probably used for sealing envelops and documents. The Korean seal collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities includes 129 bronze seals and one stone seal, reflecting the diversity and craftsmanship of Goryeo seals. The shape of the bottom plates varies from circular to rectangular, and octagonal forms. Handle shapes include simple loops on top of the bottom plate, vertical flat handles (the majority shaped in the form of a yeouidu – a cloud-shaped symbol for good fortune) with a hole for a cord and figurative handles in the shapes of lions, fishes, tortoises, humans or birds with a hole or loop for attaching a cord. Not all inscriptions are legible, but they can be categorized into personal seals, family seals, seals with symbols and stylized characters (for example longevity, wealth or health), seals with pictorial inscriptions and seals with an inscription indicating its function (for example the character for “sealed” (Korean: bong)). In many cases, the Chinese characters are written in a stylized form with meandering lines and adapted to fit the shape of the seal plate (Korean: gucheopjeon), but other types of seal script were likewise used. Not much is known about the production process of the seals, but their examination shows that, generally, smaller seals were cast in one piece, while larger seals have separately crafted handles that were attached to the bottom plate. Some of the inscriptions were fashioned out of several metal strips that were soldered onto the bottom plate of the seal.
1A typical temple, Omei Shan, Szechuan.
1Avalokiteshvara. Sculpture in gilt bronze. The Bodhisattva is represented in a tantric form, standing with eight arms holding different attributes. Inscriptions around the lotus soccle. 17th century. Nepal. H: 23,3 cm
1A view from Omei Shan, Szechuan.
1A village, Chengtu, Szechuan. Teh Yuan Photo Studio, Chungking.
1A woman on a terrace and a shakuhachi player (komuso) with basket (tengai) on his head. Suzuki Harunobu.
1Axe-form pendant. May have been copied from a woodblock print.
1Axle cap, decorated with four ox heads.