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Carlotta - the museum database

OBJTXTFörvärvsomständigheter, engelska

CountValue
1A brown envelope with Korean newspaper clips from 1961-1963 was transferred with the rubbings.
1Acquired from Elsbeth Funch (1873-1943)
1Acquired from the artist in December 1975
1Acquired from the artist in December 1975
1A group of Korean ceramics objects entered the collection at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1934 through the Swedish History Museum. They were originally transferred to the Swedish History Museum by Umehara Sueji (1893-1983), who was one of the leading archaeologists conducting research and excavations in Korea during the Japanese occupation period, in the 1920s and 1930s. Four objects, including the above-described object, are now preserved in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
2A group of Korean ceramics objects entered the collection at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1934 through the Swedish History Museum. They were originally transferred to the Swedish History Museum by Umehara Sueji (梅原末治; 1893-1983), who was one of the leading archaeologists conducting research and excavations in Korea during the Japanese occupation period, in the 1920s and 1930s. Four objects are now preserved in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
1A group of Korean ceramics objects entered the Korean collection at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1934 through the Swedish History Museum. They were originally transferred to the Swedish History Museum by Umehara Sueji (梅原末治; 1893-1983), who was one of the leading archaeologists conducting research and excavations in Korea during the Japanese occupation period, in the 1920s and 1930s. Four objects are now preserved in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as a chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
2Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
6Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
40Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr. Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical centre in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr. Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr. Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as a chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
5Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as a chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as a chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as a chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical Center (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
2Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
18Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anni Kalbak's collection (purchased) Anni Kalbak (born Anni Steinert Sørensen) was the wife of Dr Kaj Algot Kalbak (1909–1992), a Danish medical doctor, who worked as chief physician and head of the Department for Clinical Microbiology at the National Medical Center in Seoul from 1958 to 1962. The establishment of the National Medical centre (NMC) was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan that was operated during and after the Korean war (1950–1958). While living in Korea, Dr Kalbak built a collection of over 500 objects, including archaeological and ethnographic material and art objects, from a period spanning from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) to the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) that he presumably purchased from antique shops. It can be assumed that Anni Kalbak acquired objects for her own collection during this time, perhaps from the same shops. After returning to Denmark, Dr Kalbak donated his collection to the National Museum of Denmark. Anni Kalbak’s collection of more than 90 objects was purchased by the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1987. Her collection includes bronze objects from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392), a great variety of ceramic objects from the Three Kingdoms period, and the Goryeo and Joseon dynasties, and a collection of over 40 paintings from the Joseon dynasty. Especially the acquisition of the painting collection held significance for the Museum as there were not many Korean paintings in the collection up to that time.
1Anonymous donor.
1Bequeathed by Gunnel Lilja, via Jan Tengelin
2Bequest from law clerk C.G. Lindgren from the court of appeal in Stockholm
11Bequest from law clerk C.G. Lindgren from the court of appeal in Stockholm.
1Bequest of Arne Piltz, purchased from Solveig Ljungström-Piltz, Djursholm Arne C.G. Piltz (1909–1987), a Swedish pharmacist, served as the chief pharmacist (apotekschef) at the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan, Korea, between 1950 and 1958 (1950-51, 1953-54, 1957-58). After his return to Sweden, he devoted himself to promoting exchange between Sweden and Korea. He was a founding member of the Korean Society in Sweden (Koreanska Sällskapet; founded in 1961) and the initiator of the exhibition “Korean Ceramics” (“Koreansk Keramik”; February–April, 1966), at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, which represents a milestone in the dissemination of Korean art in Sweden. Many collectors lending objects for the exhibition, including the former King of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, former State-Secretary Olle Hellberg, Dr. Kaj Kalbak and Arne Piltz himself, made important contributions to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. Following Arne Piltz’ death, the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities received a Joseon period porcelain vase with an underglaze cobalt blue decoration of a dragon in his memory, and, in November 1988, the Museum acquired six more Korean objects of his collection, including an important painting (OM-1988-0091) by Heungseon Daewongun (Yi Ha-eung; 1820-1898), from his daughter, Solveig Ljungström-Piltz.
1Bequest of Arne Piltz, purchased from Solveig Ljungström-Piltz, Djursholm Arne C.G. Piltz (1909–1987), a Swedish pharmacist, served as the chief pharmacist (apotekschef) at the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan, Korea, between 1950 and 1958 (1950-51, 1953-54, 1957-58). After his return to Sweden, he devoted himself to promoting exchange between Sweden and Korea. He was a founding member of the Korean Society in Sweden (Koreanska Sällskapet; founded in 1961) and the initiator of the exhibition “Korean Ceramics” (“Koreansk Keramik”; February–April, 1966), at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, which represents a milestone in the dissemination of Korean art in Sweden. Many collectors lending objects for the exhibition, including the former King of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, former State-Secretary Olle Hellberg, Dr. Kaj Kalbak and Arne Piltz himself, made important contributions to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. Following Arne Piltz’ death, the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities received a Joseon period porcelain vase with an underglaze cobalt blue decoration of a dragon in his memory, and, in November 1988, the Museum acquired six more Korean objects of his collection, including an important royal painting by Heungseon Daewongun (1820-1898), from his daughter, Solveig Ljungström-Piltz.
1Bequest of Arne Piltz, purchased from Solveig Ljungström-Piltz, Djursholm Arne C.G. Piltz (1909–1987), a Swedish pharmacist, served as the chief pharmacist (apotekschef) at the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan, Korea, between 1950 and 1958 (1950-51, 1953-54, 1957-58). After his return to Sweden, he devoted himself to promoting exchange between Sweden and Korea. He was a founding member of the Korean Society in Sweden (Koreanska Sällskapet; founded in 1961) and the initiator of the exhibition “Korean Ceramics” (“Koreansk Keramik”; February–April, 1966), at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, which represents a milestone in the dissemination of Korean art in Sweden. Many collectors lending objects for the exhibition, including the former King of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, former State-Secretary Olle Hellberg, Dr. Kaj Kalbak and Arne Piltz himself, made important contributions to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. Following Arne Piltz’ death, the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities received a Joseon period porcelain vase with an underglaze cobalt blue decoration of a dragon in his memory, and, in November 1988, the Museum acquired six more Korean objects of his collection, including an important royal painting by Heungseon Daewongun (1820-1898), from his daughter, Solveig Ljungström-Piltz.
3Bequest of Arne Piltz, purchased from Solveig Ljungström-Piltz, Djursholm Arne C.G. Piltz (1909–1987), a Swedish pharmacist, served as the chief pharmacist (apotekschef) at the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan, Korea, between 1950 and 1958 (1950-51, 1953-54, 1957-58). After his return to Sweden, he devoted himself to promoting exchange between Sweden and Korea. He was a founding member of the Korean Society in Sweden (Koreanska Sällskapet; founded in 1961) and the initiator of the exhibition “Korean Ceramics” (“Koreansk Keramik”; February–April, 1966), at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, which represents a milestone in the dissemination of Korean art in Sweden. Many collectors lending objects for the exhibition, including the former King of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, former State-Secretary Olle Hellberg, Dr. Kaj Kalbak and Arne Piltz himself, made important contributions to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. Following Arne Piltz’ death, the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities received a Joseon period porcelain vase with an underglaze cobalt blue decoration of a dragon in his memory, and, in November 1988, the Museum acquired six more Korean objects of his collection, including an important royal painting by Heungseon Daewongun (1820-1898), from his daughter, Solveig Ljungström-Piltz.
5Bequest of Gunnel Liljas, donated through Jan Tengelin
1Bequest of Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This jar was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He acquired this jar in October 1926 in Seoul for ¥15.
1Bequest of Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He had received this oil bottle as a gift from Mr. Herschel Johnson (1894–1966; former US Minister in Stockholm) in August 1947. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in 1926 (Oct.) in Keishu for 13 Yen.
2Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea, for ca. 50 sen.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea, for ca. 50 sen.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in August 1920 in London at Bluett & Sons, 377 Oxford Street, for £ 7.10.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in June 1923 in London at Yamanaka for £4.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in November 1965 in London at Bluett & Sons for £ 48.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in October 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea, for ca. 50 sen.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in October 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea for ca. ¥50.
4Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in October 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea for ca. 50 sen.
2Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in October 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea for ca. 50 sen.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) Acquired in October 1926 in Gyeongju, Korea for ca. 50 sen(?).
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) King Gustaf VI Adolf received these five rubbings as a gift from Mr Jung-chai Choi [Jeong-chae Choi?], Gyeongju, Korea, in September 1962.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) These two objects were in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated these, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He had received these two pedestal jars in August 1962 from Mr Jeong-chae Choi(?), Gyeongju, Korea. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This artefact was given to the former king of Sweden, King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Crown Prince, in October 1926, by the Director of the Rakuro Middle School near Pyeongyang (present-day North Korea) (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf 1973). However, the roof tile itself was excavated in Gyeongju, the ancient capital of the Silla Kingdom, possibly in the early 1920s. The motif and way of decoration suggests that this tile was produced in the early Unified Silla period (668-935; when the Silla Kingdom unified the country). Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926/27, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – the Auspicious Pheonix tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bottle was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He had acquired the bottle in October 1926 in Seoul for ¥15. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bottle was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in November 1912 in London at S.M Franck Co for £10 (gift from parents-in-law). Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and the above-described celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bottle was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in October 1926 in Keishu (Gyeongju) for ¥3. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and the above-described celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bowl was acquired by the former king of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, in 1911 in London at S.M Franck Co for £6. This was the first Korean object King Gustaf VI Adolf collected. He donated this bowl, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bowl was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in October 1972 in London at Bluett & Sons for £250.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This box was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This box and the jade hairpin it contained were a gift from Dr Young Shik Cho, Chancellor, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea, to Gustaf VI Adolf, received in November 1961 in Stockholm (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf, 1973).
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This cup was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He had acquired this object in October 1926 in Pyeongyang (present-day North Korea) for ¥8. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This cup with cup stand was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was given to King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Crown Prince by Viscount Saitō Makoto (1858–1936), Governor-General of Korea, in October 1926. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This jar was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. The jar was given to the King on 11th October 1972 in Stockholm as a gift from Gaud Jensen, head of HR at the Save the Children's Association. An indication by the donor states that the jar originated from Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This lid and box were in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This lid and box, and the jade hairpin it contained were a gift from Dr Young Shik Cho, Chancellor, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea, to Gustaf VI Adolf, received in November 1961 in Stockholm (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf, 1973).
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was acquired in 1951 as a gift from Mr. Kim Dong Ho, through Dr. Kaiser. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926/27, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – the Auspicious Pheonix tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was given to the former King of Sweden, King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, in October 1926 by a Japanese collector, Moroka, in Pyeongyang (North Korea). According to the donor, this brick was found in the area of former Lelang (Lolang), near present-day Pyeongyang.
2Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. He had received this pedestal jar in August 1962 from Mr Jeong-chae Choi(?), Gyeongju, Korea. (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf in 1973) Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. The hairpin was a gift from Dr Young Shik Cho, Chancellor, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea, to Gustaf VI Adolf, received in November 1961 in Stockholm (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf, 1973).
1Bequest of King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This oil bottle was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in October 1926 in Seoul for ¥8 and given as a gift to Louise in 1931. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
3Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Bought in Henan, Mien-Chih-Hsien
1Collected by Johan Gunnar Andersson between 1920 - 1923
9Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf and Crown Princess Louise acquired this object from the Governor-General of Korea (generalgovernören) in 1930 and, in July the same year, donated the object for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
1Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf and Crown Princess Louise acquired this object from the Governor-General of Korea (generalgovernören) in 1930 and, in July the same year, donated the object for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
1<0x0a>Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf and Crown Princess Louise acquired this object from the Governor-General of Korea (generalgovernören) in 1930 and, in July the same year, donated the object for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
6Donated by Ambassador John Wingstrand in March 2006
1Donated by Ambassador John Wingstrand in March 2006(?)
1Donated by Ambassador Tage Grönwall and his wife, Inger Grönwall
2Donated by Ambassador Tage Grönwall and his wife, Inger Grönwall.
1Donated by Ambassador Yu Jae-hong
1Donated by Bengt and Ulla Gullberg
1Donated by Bengt Julin
1Donated by Commander Göte Blom
1Donated by Commander Nils-Erik and Inga Ödman
2Donated by Dr. Lars Erik Warfvinge, Halmstad. The collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr. Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
1Donated by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge, Halmstad A collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
1Donated by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge, Halmstad A collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
1Donated by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge A collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
3Donated by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge A collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
1Donated by Folke Wennerberg
2Donated by Gertrud Sundgren Bäckström
6Donated by Gertrud Sundgren-Bäckström
12Donated by Greta Dahlström
1Donated by Greta Dahlström, Solna
1Donated by Gulli Högbom
1Donated by Gunnar Hultmark (in 1991)
1Donated by Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This object was given to former king of Sweden, His Majesty King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Crown Prince, in 1926, by The Society of Preservation of Antiquities in Gyeongju, Korea. The object was donated for inclusion in the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) in 1927.
5Donated by Hanna Engver
3Donated by Inga Leijon Nyström
21Donated by Jens Warfvinge
2Donated by Jens Warfvinge
45Donated by Jens Warfvinge in 2012
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973). The old catalogue records state that this artefact was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess."). This object was probably acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973). The old catalogue records state that this artefact was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess."). This object was probably acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973). The old catalogue records state that this artefact was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess."). This object was probably acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. Following the couple’s return to Sweden in 1927, the gold earring and other objects that the Crown Prince directly acquired or was given during his stay in Korea were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973). The old catalogue records state that this artefact was found near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Items from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. Fragments of clay figures found near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea. Sira [Silla] Period. K4025: 1-2."). This object was probably acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - the Auspicious Phoenix tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed, and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring (Accession No. K-04026-001) as a commemorative gift. The character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “Seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973). The old catalogue records state that this artefact was found near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. Fragments of clay figures found near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea. Sira [Silla] Period. K4025: 1-2."). This object was probably acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed, and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring (Accession No. K-04026-001) as a commemorative gift. The character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “Seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation can be seen at the site, and a pine tree planted by the Crown Prince is still in situ in front of the Gyeongju Culture Center (Gyeongju munhwawon). This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) The old catalogue records state that this artefact is one of a collection of four objects that was found near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities after their journey to Korea (1926). (“Collection of objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. 'Sira-gi yaki'', pottery of Sira [Silla] period. 5th or 6th cent. A.D. Found near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea."). This object was acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeo.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
2Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) The old catalogue records state that this artefact is one of a collection of four objects that was found near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities after their journey to Korea (1926). (“Collection of objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. 'Sira-gi yaki'', pottery of Sira [Silla] period. 5th or 6th cent. A.D. Found near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea."). This object was acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeo.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) The old catalogue records state that this artefact is one of a collection of four objects that was found near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was donated by the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities after their journey to Korea (1926). (“Collection of objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. 'Sira-gi yaki'', pottery of Sira [Silla] period. 5th or 6th cent. A.D. Found near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea."). This object was acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Queen Louise (1889 – 1965), then Crown Princess, during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed and the Crown Prince received a precious gold earring as a commemorative gift. In addition, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeo.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) The old catalogue records state that this artefact was found in a tomb near the city of Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), and was a gift from Viscount Saitō Makoto (1858–1936), Governor-General of Korea, to the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess who donated the earring for inclusion in the collection of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (“Objects from Korea handed over to the East Asian Collections (Östasiatiska Samlingarna) by Their Royal Highnesses the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess. Gold Ear pendant. Found [in] a tomb near Keishū [Gyeongju] Southern Korea. Earlier Sira [Silla] Period. (5th or 6th cent A.D). Presented by Viscount[?] Saito."). This object was acquired by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, and Crown Princess Louise (1889 – 1965) during their journey to Korea in October 1926. The royal couple visited Gyeongju where the Crown Prince, who had a keen interest in Korean art and archaeology, had the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century - The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Seobongchong) - on 10th October 1926. A golden crown with phoenix ornaments (Treasure No. 339, now held in the National Museum of Korea; Bongwan-014319-00000) was unearthed, and the Crown Prince received the above-described gold earring as a commemorative gift. Also, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious", was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, "Seojeon.” Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation can be seen at the site, and a pine tree planted by the Crown Prince is still in situ in front of the Gyeongju Culture Center (Gyeongju munhwawon). This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) The old catalogue records state that this object was donated by the Crown Prince to the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1 November 1938.
1Donated by King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This bowl was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in December 1909 in London at Franck Co for £2. Born in 1882, King Gustaf VI Adolf was a great promoter and supporter of the study of humanities and had a strong interest in archaeology, the visual arts and crafts. He chaired many committees, institutions and associations related to archaeology and played an important role in the creation of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). At an early age, he started collecting Chinese art and developed his connoisseurship through exchange with leading collectors and experts in the field. The King also pioneered the study and collecting of Korean art and archaeological artefacts in Sweden. His earliest Korean acquisitions include a Goryeo celadon bowl (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1771) and a celadon maebyeong bottle with iron brown decoration (see object Accession No. OM-1974-1772) acquired in 1911 and 1912 respectively. Later, in 1926, the then Crown Prince and Crown Princess Louise departed on their “Round-the-World-Tour” (1926-1927), a private journey which also held diplomatic significance. From the United States, where they began their journey, they traveled to Asia, first to Japan, and then to Korea and China. In Korea, the royal couple first stayed in Gyeongju, the old capital of the Silla Kingdom (57 BCE – 935 CE), where they did not only visit significant historical sites, but the Crown Prince was also given the opportunity to participate in the excavation of a royal Silla tomb of the 5th century – The Auspicious Phoenix Tomb (Korean: Seobongchong) (10th October 1926). The tomb yielded a rare golden crown with phoenix ornaments and other precious artefacts – it was only the third time that a gold crown was excavated from a Silla tomb. The gold crown was designated as treasure (Treasure No. 339) and is now held in the National Museum of Korea (Bongwan-014319-00000). To commemorate the event, the Crown Prince received a gold earring dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE) as a gift (MFEA, Accession No. K-04026-001). Furthermore, the character "seo" in the tomb's name, which means "auspicious," was borrowed from the first character of the Korean name for Sweden, “seojeon.” and combined with the character for phoenix, “bong,” in reference to the phoenix decoration on the gold crown. Today, an engraved stone stele in memory of the royal visit and the Crown Prince’s participation in the excavation as well as a tree planted by the Crown Prince can still be seen at the site. This visit of the later King of Sweden to Korea is considered an important event in Korean-Swedish relations. From Gyeongju, the royal couple continued their travels to Seoul and Pyeongyang before departing for China. In Gyeongju and on his further travels, the Crown Prince was given or acquired Korean objects, mostly archeological artefacts dating to the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE). Around 10 objects that he collected during his trip to Korea, including the gold earring, were donated for inclusion in the collections of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities upon his return to Sweden. The rest of the objects the King collected in Korea and other Korean artefacts he had acquired during the years before and after his journey were donated to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the MFEA in 1973. The King’s Korean collection reflects his strong interest in Korean history, culture and archaeology, but also his remarkable connoisseurship. The objects from the King’s collection form the core of the Korean collection at the MFEA and contain objects of high quality and rarity.
1Donated by Lars Vargö
3Donated by Nils Fredrik and Paul Olof Rudebeck
1Donated by Nils Fredrik and Paul Olof Rudebeck
1Donated by Nils Fredrik och Paul Olof Rudebeck
1Donated by Orvar Karlbeck(?)
2Donated by Skandia-Freja Insurance Company
2Donated by So Jin-sook
11Donated by Tage Grönwall
1Donated by the artist
1Donated by the Axel and Nora Lundgren Foundation Paul Champkins purchased this object through the Axel and Nora Lundgren Foundation in London for £4.000.
1Donated by the Axel and Nora Lundgren Foundation This object was purchased from David Newman in London for £11.000.
1Donated by the Embassy of the Republic of Korea
2Donated by the Friends of Östasiatiska Museet association
1Donated by the National Library of Sweden
1Donated by the National Library of Sweden
9Donated by Werner Schmidt
1Donated in 1933 by M D Kelekian
1Donation in memory of Pharmacist Arne Piltz, Djursholm Arne C.G. Piltz (1909–1987), a Swedish pharmacist, served as the chief pharmacist (apotekschef) at the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan, Korea, between 1950 and 1958 (1950-51, 1953-54, 1957-58). After his return to Sweden, he devoted himself to promoting exchange between Sweden and Korea. He was a founding member of the Korean Society in Sweden (Koreanska Sällskapet; founded in 1961) and the initiator of the exhibition “Korean Ceramics” (“Koreansk Keramik”; February–April, 1966), at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities, which represents a milestone in the dissemination of Korean art in Sweden. Many collectors lending objects for the exhibition, including the former King of Sweden, Gustaf VI Adolf, former State-Secretary Olle Hellberg, Dr. Kaj Kalbak and Arne Piltz himself, made important contributions to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. Following Arne Piltz’ death, the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities received a Joseon period porcelain vase with an underglaze cobalt blue decoration of a dragon in his memory, and, in November 1988, the Museum acquired six more Korean objects of his collection, including an important royal painting by Heungseon Daewongun (1820-1898), from his daughter, Solveig Ljungström-Piltz.
7Georg von Békésy Collection, Nobel Foundation
1Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This roof tile was given to the former king of Sweden, King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Crown Prince, in October 1926 by a Japanese collector, Moroka, in Pyeongyang (present-day North Korea).
1Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) This roof tile was given to the former King of Sweden, King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973), then Crown Prince, in October 1926 by the Director of the Rakuro Middle School near Pyeongyang (present-day North Korea).
1King Gustaf VI Adolf (1882 – 1973) According to the old catalogue records, King Gustaf VI Adolf, then Crown Prince, acquired this object in May 1928 in London at Bluett & Sons(?) for £2.
1Osvald Sirén collection; Bequest of Margherita Sirén. This box was collected by Sirén and entered the collection through a bequest of Sirén’s daughter Margherita in 1984.
4Purchased
1Purchased 1967 from Victoria Lindström for SEK2.000, bequest of Greta and Georg Edlund
1Purchased at Bocca Tigris, Stockholm, for SEK12.000.
1Purchased from Ambassador Tage Grönwall and his wife, Inger Grönwall, for 2000 kr.
1Purchased from Ambassador Tage Grönwall and his wife, Inger Grönwall, for SEK10.000.
2Purchased from Ambassador Tage Grönwall and his wife, Inger Grönwall, for SEK2000.
22Purchased from Gertrud Sundgren
1Purchased from Gertrud Sundgren
1Purchased from Gertrud Sundgren, Ängelholm
2Purchased from Gertrud Sundgren, Ängelholm.
1Purchased from Gertrud Sundgren-Bäckström
1Purchased from Gunnel Lilja for SEK3.000.
2Purchased from Jin Sook So
2Purchased from Mr Rhee Eui-jae
1Purchased from Mr Rhee Eui-jae This bottle was acquired as part of a group of seven objects (Accession No. OM-1988-0033 to OM-1988-0039) purchased in 1988 from Mr Rhee Eui-jae for SEK20.000.
1Purchased from Mr Rhee Eui-jae This chest was acquired as part of a group of seven objects (Accession No. OM-1988-0033 to OM-1988-0039) purchased in 1988 from Mr Rhee Eui-jae for SEK20.000.
1Purchased from Mr Rhee Eui-jae This chest was acquired as part of a group of seven objects (Accession No. OM-1988-0033 to OM-1988-0039) purchased in 1988 from Mr Rhee Eui-jae for SEK20.000.
2Purchased from Mr Rhee Eui-jae This chest was acquired as part of a group of seven objects (Accession No. OM-1988-0033 to OM-1988-0039) purchased in 1988 from Mr Rhee Eui-jae for SEK20.000.
1Purchased from Orvar Karlbeck This object was purchased in Shanghai by Orvar Karlbeck.
1Purchased from Osvald Sirén Osvald Sirén (1879-1966), a Finnish-born Swedish art historian, was appointed professor for Art History at Stockholm University from 1908 to 1923 and Keeper of Paintings and Sculptures at the National Museum from 1928 to 1944, and contributed significantly to the formation of the East Asian collections at the National Museum and the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities (MFEA). He travelled to East Asia four times between 1918 and 1935 to conduct research and to make acquisitions. His research was devoted mainly to Chinese paintings, architecture and gardens. However, he also showed an interest in Korea and travelled there in 1929 on his way from Japan to China on his third journey to East Asia (1929-1930). Among his documents, study material about Japanese Buddhist sculpture with references to Korea as well as copies of lecture material of the Tokyo Imperial College on Korean architecture (tombs of the Three Kingdoms period (57 BC–668 CE), and temple and palace architecture of the Goryeo (918–1392) and the Joseon dynasties (1392–1910)) can be found. He probably studied the material while staying in Japan in January 1929 as a preparation for his visit to Korea. Apart from making acquisitions for the National Museum, Sirén also purchased art objects to form his private collection, from which he sold (in some cases through donors) or lent objects to the MFEA as well as the National Museum. Such an object is the Korean bronze mirror in the collection of the MFEA (K-11000-535; purchased 1925), which he acquired in China during one of his earlier trips. A box with inlaid decoration of the Goryeo dynasty (OM-1984-0036) collected by Sirén, entered the collection in 1984 through a bequest of Sirén’s daughter Margherita. Although there are only two Korean objects associated with Sirén in the collection, 20 photographs he took during his trip to Korea, now held in the photo archive of the MFEA, reflect his interest in Korean architecture and sculpture and serve as important documentation of historical sites. Also, his series (8 photographs) of street scenes and portraits offer a glimpse into everyday life in early 20th century Korea.
3Purchased from State-Secretary Olle Hellberg
2Purchased from the artist in 1976
1Purchased in 1976
1Purchased together with another calligraphy (Accession No. OM-1988-0028) in 1988 from the artist for SEK8.000.
1Purchased together with another calligraphy (Accession No. OM-1988-0029) in 1988 from the artist for SEK8.000.
1Purchased together with painting Accession No. OM-1984-0001 for SEK17,000
1Purchased together with painting Accession No. OM-1984-0002 for SEK17,000.
34This group of sherds was accompanied by a paper note: "Skärvor av koreansk keramik gåva från Warfvinge och Bo Back[?]" (Korean sherds donated by Warfvinge and Bo Back(?))
1This object belongs to a collection of 130 seals of the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) donated by Dr. Lars Erik Warfvinge, Halmstad. The collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr. Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
129This object belongs to a collection of 130 seals of the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) donated by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge, Halmstad. The collection of 130 seals as well as eight other objects, including ceramics from the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE–668 CE) and metal wares from the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) were donated to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1972 by Dr Lars Erik Warfvinge (1913–1992). Warfvinge, a Swedish medical doctor, was stationed at the National Medical Center (NMC) in Seoul between 1965 and 1967. The establishment of the NMC was a joint medical project between the Scandinavian countries, the UNKRA (United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency) and the Korean government. The Swedish contribution to the NMC was a continuation of the medical assistance provided by the Swedish government to Korea during and after the Korean War (1950–1953) that started with the setup and operation of the Swedish Red Cross Hospital in Busan (1950–1958). Warfvinge built his collection during the time he served in Korea by acquiring objects on the local market, probably through antique shops. In 1996, his son, Jens Erik Warfvinge (born 1952), donated another 23 objects to the Korean collections at the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. This group of objects comprises a majority of ceramics and few Goryeo metal objects.
4This object was accompanied by a paper note: "Skärvor av koreansk keramik gåva från Warfvinge och Bo Back[?]" (Korean sherds donated by Warfvinge and Bo Back(?))
1This object was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. The hairpin was a gift from Dr. Young Shik Cho, Chancellor, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea, to Gustaf VI Adolf, received in November 1961 in Stockholm (Testament of HMK Gustaf VI Adolf, 1973). The object was accompanied by the note: "Hair pin of seven jewels worn by the princess (In the Lee dynasty. About 300 years ago.)" The hairpin was given to the King inside a lacquer box.
1This object was in the collection of King Gustaf VI Adolf. He donated this, and other objects, to the people of Sweden through a bequest to the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities in 1973. This object was acquired in 1926 (Oct.) in Seoul for ¥4.
1소진숙 기증